Photo Credit: Candice Ward-USA TODAY Sports

Lane MacDermid Retires


 

Lane MacDermid was a 2009 draft pick by the Boston Bruins. He played 8 games with the club before being traded to the Dallas Stars.

From there, he came to Calgary. After acquiring Lane MacDermid back in November 2013, the Calgary Flames sent him down to the AHL Abbotsford Heat. At 6’3″ and 205 lbs, he added bulk to the Flames AHL affiliate team. He played one game for the Flames and was then sent back down to Abbotsford.

Recently, MacDermid was suspended from playing in the AHL after he neglected to show up for the Heat after the AHL All-Star break. Now, a few days later, it has been reported by TheScore.com and NESN.com that MacDermid has decided to retire. His reason, as quoted, was his loss of “passion to play.”

Hockey life is hard. It’s even harder for a grinder. To lose passion for a game that means so much to so many has got to be tough to deal with, especially when you have hockey roots (Lane’s father is Paul MacDermid, who played for Washington, Hartford, Quebec, and Winnipeg in the NHL). But these players show us the realistic side of hockey – that there really are more important things in life than a game.

Good luck, Lane, in whatever you choose to do in life. Thank you for you time with the Flames, and I wish you all the best!

Tags: Calgary Flames

  • JC

    He was the first player called up from Providence when the Bruins had injuries to the grinders in big heavyweight matches. He could throw em.

    • http://www.flameforthought.com/ Traci Kay

      He was definitely great at what he did. But, from what I’ve been reading, he lost his passion for the game. In my opinion, being a grinder is one of the hardest roles on any team, mentally, emotionally, and physically.

      There was a great docu-film that Chris “Knuckles” Nilan starred in called The Last Gladiators, directed by Alex Gibney, and it changed my views on grinders. I have a lot more sympathy and understanding for the gritty role of “tough guys” in hockey.

      I wish all the best to Lane in whatever he may choose to do. And I’m grateful that we had him for the short time that we did.